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History: CPLT324_Shakespeare

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+ William Shakespeare Hamlet Questions for CPLT 324 World Literature to 1650, Fall 2009, Instructor Alfred J. Drake, Ph.D. at California State University, Fullerton
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- [mailto:cplt324@ajdrake.com|Email]</b> | ((CPLT324_Requirements|Home))</b> | ((CPLT324_Syllabus|Syllabus))</b> | ((CPLT324_Policies|Policies))</b> | ((CPLT324_Questions|Questions)) | ((CPLT324_Presentations|Presentations)) ((CPLT324_Journals|Journals)) | ((CPLT324_Paper|Paper)) | ((CPLT324_Final_Prep|Final)) | ((Blogs_Indices|Blogs)) | ((CPLT324_Audio|Audio)) | [http://www.ajdrake.com/wiki/tiki-list_file_gallery.php|Guides] | [http://www.ajdrake.com/wiki/tiki-directory_browse.php|Links]
+ <b>[mailto:cplt324@ajdrake.com|Email]</b> | <b>((CPLT324_Requirements|Home))</b> | <b>((CPLT324_Syllabus|Syllabus))</b> | <b>((CPLT324_Policies|Policies))</b> | <b>((CPLT324_Questions|Questions))</b> | <b>((CPLT324_Presentations|Presentations))</b> <b>((CPLT324_Journals|Journals))</b> | <b>((CPLT324_Paper|Paper))</b> | <b>((CPLT324_Final_Prep|Final))</b> | <b>((Blogs_Indices|Blogs))</b> | <b>((CPLT324_Audio|Audio))</b> | <b>[http://www.ajdrake.com/wiki/tiki-list_file_gallery.php|Guides]</b> | <b>[http://www.ajdrake.com/wiki/tiki-directory_browse.php|Links]</b>
+ Assigned: Shakespeare. Hamlet (2821-2918).
- Assigned: Shakespeare. ''Hamlet'' (2821-2918).
- __Hamlet__
+ <h3><i>HAMLET</i></h3>
- <h3>ACT 1</h3>
+ <h3><b>ACT 1</b></h3>

1. In Act 1, Scene 1, Marcellus and Bernardo looked to Hamlet's friend Horatio to interpret the apparition they have seen. What assumptions does Horatio make, and what leads him to make such assumptions?

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- <h3>ACT 2</h3>
+ <h3><b>ACT 2</b></h3>

8. In Act 2, Scene 1, Polonius keeps tabs on Laertes and is sure Hamlet has gone mad for love of Ophelia. Polonius is often portrayed to match Hamlet's estimation of him as a "foolish, prating knave." How would you stage this character, and why? (You might also consider Act 2, scene two, where Polonius lays out a plan for Claudius.)

@@ -Lines: 58-62 changed to +Lines: 73-77 @@

- <h3>ACT 3</h3>
+ <h3><b>ACT 3</b></h3>

14. In Act 3, Scene 1, Hamlet speaks his famous "to be or not to be" soliloquy. He has already rejected suicide as un-Christian, so what exactly is the point of this speech -- what does he admit? Does that admission entirely account for his failure to act so far? Explain.

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- 16. In Act 3, Scene 2, why should there be a "dumb show" preceding the main play The Murder of Gonzago (or, in Hamlet's revision, The Mouse Trap)? Why would this representational doubling up be the most effective way to "catch the conscience of the king"? Why does Hamlet need this confirmation anyhow? (You may want to refer to the end of Act 2, scene 2 for Hamlet's explanation.)
+ 16. In Act 3, Scene 2, why should there be a "dumb show" preceding the main play <i>The Murder of Gonzago</i> (or, in Hamlet's revision, <i>The Mouse Trap</i>)? Why would this representational doubling up be the most effective way to "catch the conscience of the king"? Why does Hamlet need this confirmation anyhow? (You may want to refer to the end of Act 2, scene 2 for Hamlet's explanation.)


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- <h3>ACT 4</h3>
+ <h3><b>ACT 4</b></h3>

20. In Act 4, Scenes 1-4, Claudius deals with the aftermath of Polonius' death, sending Hamlet off to England with a sealed death sentence. In scene 4, Hamlet catches sight of Fortinbras' troops on their way to war in Poland. What insight does Hamlet gather from this incident -- is the resolution he draws from it convincing, or unconvincing? Explain.

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- <h3>ACT 5</h3>
+ <h3><b>ACT 5</b></h3>
- 23. In Act 5, Scene 1, Hamlet, having made his escape at sea and been set ashore by pirates, now joins Horatio in an extended and partly comic confrontation with a punctilious gravedigger ("First Clown") and several visual reminders of death (memento mori). In what sense does this scene advance the play's action -- at least indirectly -- rather than just amounting to comic relief? What insight does Hamlet draw from talking to the gravedigger, meditating upon the skull of "poor Yorick," etc?
+ 23. In Act 5, Scene 1, Hamlet, having made his escape at sea and been set ashore by pirates, now joins Horatio in an extended and partly comic confrontation with a punctilious gravedigger ("First Clown") and several visual reminders of death (<i>memento mori</i>). In what sense does this scene advance the play's action -- at least indirectly -- rather than just amounting to comic relief? What insight does Hamlet draw from talking to the gravedigger, meditating upon the skull of "poor Yorick," etc?


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- 25. In Act 5, Scene 2, Hamlet explains to Horatio how he has managed to return to Denmark. If the beginning of this scene marks Hamlet's recognition (in Aristotelian terms, his anagnorisis), what is that recognition and where does it seem to have come from? How do Hamlet's utterances about "divinity" (providence) reflect on his adherence to an ancient revenge code that demands blood for blood?
+ 25. In Act 5, Scene 2, Hamlet explains to Horatio how he has managed to return to Denmark. If the beginning of this scene marks Hamlet's recognition (in Aristotelian terms, his <i>anagnorisis</i>), what is that recognition and where does it seem to have come from? How do Hamlet's utterances about "divinity" (providence) reflect on his adherence to an ancient revenge code that demands blood for blood?


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- __Alternate Edition:__ Lawall, Sarah, ed. The Norton Anthology of World Literature. 2nd ed. Vol. 1C. New York: Norton, 2002. ISBN A = 0393977552, B = 0393977560, C = 0393977579.
+ <b>Edition:</b> Lawall, Sarah, ed. <i>The Norton Anthology of World Literature.</i> 2nd ed. Vol. 1C. New York: Norton, 2002. ISBN A = 0393977552, B = 0393977560, C = 0393977579.


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