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History: CPLT325_Paper_Fall_15

Comparing version 1 with version 3

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- <h3>^-=TERM PAPER FOR CPLT 325 WORLD LITERATURE FROM 1650, CSU FULLERTON FALL 2015 (08/24/15)=-^
+ <h3>^-=TERM PAPER FOR CPLT 325 WORLD LIT, CSU FULLERTON FALL 2015 (11/12/15)=-^


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- NOTE: TIME PERMITTING, I MAY POST SEVERAL MORE SPECIFIC PAPER TOPICS HERE LATER IN THE SEMESTER, BUT THEY WILL BE OPTIONAL -- YOU ARE ENCOURAGED TO DEVELOP YOUR OWN TOPIC.
+ NOTE: THE SPECIFIC PAPER TOPICS BELOW ARE OPTIONAL -- YOU ARE ENCOURAGED TO DEVELOP YOUR OWN TOPIC.~~#7B5E00:1. Some of our texts are fairly categorized as “realist” in their approach –Tolstoy's <i>The Death of Ivan Ilyich,</i> Dostoyevsky's <i>Notes from Underground,</i> Chekhov’s The Cherry Orchard, and Higuchi Ichiyo's "Separate Ways" would be some examples. Choose one of these texts and concentrate on how it generates interest, tension, and significance in the absence of larger-than-life characters and heroic action. What questions and dilemmas does realism open up for exploration, and what implications does it hold for our understanding of individual identity and the power of social conventions and institutions?~~~~#7B5E00:2. Some of our texts -- Voltaire's <i>Candide,</i> the poetry of the French symbolist Baudelaire, , Brecht’s The Good Woman of Szechuan, and Kafka’s The Metamorphosis,," to name the obvious ones -- are experimental in form or embrace the absurd/irrational/fantastic in content, or both. Choose one text (or at most two) and explore the benefits of the work's strangeness in terms of form and/or content -- what is gained by the author's embrace of this unusual subject matter or manner of structuring and developing the relevant text?~~~~#7B5E00: 3. Goethe’s Faust is associated with European Romanticism. We know that the author is working with a legend of several centuries‘ standing, one in which the protagonist is condemned for seeking forbidden knowledge. In Part II (which we did not read), Goethe’s hero escapes that fate. What clues can you find in the first play that might help explain this eventual outcome? That is, what is potentially redemptive about Faust’s attitude and conduct? What is the nature of the knowledge he seeks, and what attitude does the play as a whole take up towards that knowledge and the pursuit thereof?~~ ~~#7B5E00:4. We have read selections by a number of Enlightenment-era authors. Choose one or at most two of them and explore the quality of analysis that you find in them with regard to the particular subjects they discuss. How does the text (or texts) you choose help to shape your understanding of what is meant by "the Enlightenment" and "enlightened discussion"? What limitations or blind spots do you find, and what uncommon strengths do you find in the reasoning you examine?~~~~#7B5E00:5. We have read selections by a number of British Romantic poets -- Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, and two German Romantics: Hölderlin and Heine. Choose one or at most two of them and explore the significance of the natural world in the poetry that you analyze -- what is the relationship, for example, between humanity and nature? What is the value of nature in and of itself? Alternatively, what is the significance of human imagination and mythic narrative and frameworks in one or two romantic poems?~~


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