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QUESTIONS FOR CPLT 325 WORLD LITERATURE FROM 1650, CSU FULLERTON SPRING 2011 (1/24/10)
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<p align="center"><strong>Email | Home | Syllabus | Policies | Questions | Journals | Paper | Final | Blogs | Audio | Guides <br>Links | CSUF Irvine Campus | CSUF Library | CSUF Catalog | CSUF Calendar | CSUF Exam Schedule</strong></p>


<p>The same question set below will serve for all authors on our syllabus. <em>The basic assignment is to respond to three of the questions below for each author.</em> For authors whose works are very short, perhaps 1-1 1/2 pages total will probably do fine, while longer texts may call for 2-3 pages of work total. Detailed instructions on the journal requirement are located at <strong>Journals</strong>.</p>

<h3><font color="#7800A7">General Questions</font></h3>

<p>1. Consider a very limited portion of the present text you're reading by our assigned authors — a stanza or two from a poem, a paragraph from a longer prose work, or a small section chosen from within a scene in a play. Analyze it in as much detail as you can: what formal, thematic, or other matters are most important to attend to in the section about which you have chosen to write, and why?</p>

<p>2. What did you find most difficult to understand (or, alternately, to accept or like) while reading the text/s assigned for this author? What did you do to try to get past the difficulty you describe and understand the work better? Explain with reference to some specific quality that you can tie to a specific part of the text, not with vague and general remarks.</p>

<p>3. Offer an assessment of what you consider most worth noting about one text assigned for a specific author: in other words, what do you take away from your experience with the work <em>as a whole?</em> Explain with reference to specific qualities or issues — don't respond with vague praise or unqualified dismissal.</p>

<p>4. Build and respond to your own specific, substantive question. This may prove useful if you find that there's something about the text you're interested in but can't place it in terms of the questions I have provided.</p>

<h3><font color="#008000">Period or Movement-based Questions</font></h3>

<p>5. To what period and/or movement does the assigned text belong? How do the relevant Norton Anthology's author/period/movement introductions (or other critical material you specify) influence your understanding of the text's meaning and value? How do specific qualities or characteristics of the text illustrate or, alternately, play against the movement-based or period-based expectations you brought to that work?</p>

<h3><font color="#008000">Genre-based questions</font></h3>

<p>6. If the assigned work is a <u>poem</u>, the key thing to discuss is usually its quality <em>as language</em> — I mean that in poetry, it's not so much "story" or "action" that matters most, it's the medium itself: the refined, thought-provoking, emotion-inducing, clarity-enhancing arrangement of words on a page. Words are playing in a very intense spotlight in poetry. How is that quality on display in the particular poem/s you're now reading?</p>

<p>7. If the assigned work is <u>prose fiction</u> (a short story, novella, or full novel), the key thing to discuss is probably its way of proceeding as <em>narrative,</em> i.e. as a piece of writing that tells a story. What strikes you about it as a story — is it the story itself? The narrator? The characters? What's distinctive, that is, about this particular piece of story-telling fiction by this author? Discuss with reference to one or more specific passages in the text.</p>

<p>8. If the assigned work is a <u>drama</u>, one key thing to discuss is often the play's manner of representing an action: a play's script is meant to bring carefully delineated or imagined events to life on a stage and thereby to evoke an intellectual/emotional response in an audience. What specific resources (language, structure, settings, realism, symbolic content, character development or revelation, etc.) does the playwright most fully bring to bear in order to further the play's aims as a representation of some "action"?</p>


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<head>

</head>
<body>

<h3><div align="center">
QUESTIONS FOR CPLT 325 WORLD LITERATURE FROM 1650, CSU FULLERTON SPRING 2011 (1/24/10)
</div></h3>

<p align="center">Image </p>

<p align="center"><strong>Email | Home | Syllabus | Policies | Questions | Journals | Paper | Final | Blogs | Audio | Guides <br>Links | CSUF Irvine Campus | CSUF Library | CSUF Catalog | CSUF Calendar | CSUF Exam Schedule</strong></p>


<p>The same question set below will serve for all authors on our syllabus. <em>The basic assignment is to respond to three of the questions below for each author.</em> For authors whose works are very short, perhaps 1-1 1/2 pages total will probably do fine, while longer texts may call for 2-3 pages of work total. Detailed instructions on the journal requirement are located at <strong>Journals</strong>.</p>

<h3><font color="#7800A7">General Questions</font></h3>

<p>1. Consider a very limited portion of the present text you're reading by our assigned authors — a stanza or two from a poem, a paragraph from a longer prose work, or a small section chosen from within a scene in a play. Analyze it in as much detail as you can: what formal, thematic, or other matters are most important to attend to in the section about which you have chosen to write, and why?</p>

<p>2. What did you find most difficult to understand (or, alternately, to accept or like) while reading the text/s assigned for this author? What did you do to try to get past the difficulty you describe and understand the work better? Explain with reference to some specific quality that you can tie to a specific part of the text, not with vague and general remarks.</p>

<p>3. Offer an assessment of what you consider most worth noting about one text assigned for a specific author: in other words, what do you take away from your experience with the work <em>as a whole?</em> Explain with reference to specific qualities or issues — don't respond with vague praise or unqualified dismissal.</p>

<p>4. Build and respond to your own specific, substantive question. This may prove useful if you find that there's something about the text you're interested in but can't place it in terms of the questions I have provided.</p>

<h3><font color="#7800A7">Period or Movement-based Questions</font></h3>

<p>5. To what period and/or movement does the assigned text belong? How do the relevant Norton Anthology's author/period/movement introductions (or other critical material you specify) influence your understanding of the text's meaning and value? How do specific qualities or characteristics of the text illustrate or, alternately, play against the movement-based or period-based expectations you brought to that work?</p>

<h3><font color="#7800A7">Genre-based questions</font></h3>

<p>6. If the assigned work is a <u>poem</u>, the key thing to discuss is usually its quality <em>as language</em> — I mean that in poetry, it's not so much "story" or "action" that matters most, it's the medium itself: the refined, thought-provoking, emotion-inducing, clarity-enhancing arrangement of words on a page. Words are playing in a very intense spotlight in poetry. How is that quality on display in the particular poem/s you're now reading?</p>

<p>7. If the assigned work is <u>prose fiction</u> (a short story, novella, or full novel), the key thing to discuss is probably its way of proceeding as <em>narrative,</em> i.e. as a piece of writing that tells a story. What strikes you about it as a story — is it the story itself? The narrator? The characters? What's distinctive, that is, about this particular piece of story-telling fiction by this author? Discuss with reference to one or more specific passages in the text.</p>

<p>8. If the assigned work is a <u>drama</u>, one key thing to discuss is often the play's manner of representing an action: a play's script is meant to bring carefully delineated or imagined events to life on a stage and thereby to evoke an intellectual/emotional response in an audience. What specific resources (language, structure, settings, realism, symbolic content, character development or revelation, etc.) does the playwright most fully bring to bear in order to further the play's aims as a representation of some "action"?</p>


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