Loading...
 

History: E222_Syllabus_Spr_12

Comparing version 2 with version 7

VersionLast Version

@@ -Lines: 15-19 changed to +Lines: 15-19 @@

- <h3>^-=SYLLABUS FOR E222 AMERICAN LITERATURE FROM TWAIN TO THE MODERNS, CSU FULLERTON SPRING 2012 (12/2/11)=-^
+ <h3>^-=SYLLABUS FOR E222 AMERICAN LITERATURE, CSU FULLERTON SPRING 2012 (1/23/12)=-^


@@ -Lines: 21-31 changed to +Lines: 21-31 @@

- <b>[mailto:e222@ajdrake.com|Email] | ((E222_Requirements_Spr_12|Home)) | ((E222_Syllabus_Spr_12|Syllabus)) | ((E222_Policies_Spr_12|Policies)) | ((E222_Questions_Spr_12|Questions)) | ((E222_Presentations_Spr_12|Presentations)) | ((E222_Journals_Spr_12|Journals)) | ((E222_Paper_Spr_12|Paper)) | ((E222_Exam_Spr_12|Final)) | ((Blogs_Indices|Blogs))((E222_Audio_Spr_12|Audio)) | [http://www.ajdrake.com/wiki/tiki-list_file_gallery.php|Guides] | [http://www.ajdrake.com/wiki/tiki-directory_browse.php|Links] | [http://www.library.fullerton.edu/|CSUF Library] | [http://www.fullerton.edu/catalog/|CSUF Catalog] | [http://myweb.fullerton.edu/AcademicCalendar/|CSUF Calendar] | [http://www.fullerton.edu/admissions/CurrentStudent/FinalExaminations.asp|CSUF Exam Schedule]</b>
+ <b>[mailto:e222@ajdrake.com|Email] | ((E222_Requirements_Spr_12|Home)) | ((E222_Syllabus_Spr_12|Syllabus)) | ((E222_Policies_Spr_12|Policies)) | ((E222_Presentations_Spr_12|Presentations)) | ((E222_Journals_Spr_12|Journals)) | ((E222_Paper_Spr_12|Paper)) | ((E222_Exam_Spr_12|Final)) | ((Blogs_Indices|Blogs)) | ((E222_Audio_Spr_12|Audio)) [http://www.ajdrake.com/wiki/tiki-list_file_gallery.php|Guides] | [http://www.ajdrake.com/wiki/tiki-directory_browse.php|Links] | [http://www.library.fullerton.edu/|CSUF Library] | [http://www.fullerton.edu/catalog/|CSUF Catalog] | [http://myweb.fullerton.edu/AcademicCalendar/|CSUF Calendar] | [http://www.fullerton.edu/admissions/CurrentStudent/FinalExaminations.asp|CSUF Exam Schedule]</b>


BASIC INFORMATION


- <b>COURSE INFORMATION.</b> English 222, Course Code 20799, Section 4. Tuesdays and Thursdays 11:30 a.m.-12:45 p.m., <b>[http://www.fullerton.edu/campusmap/images/campus%20map%20color_1008.pdf| Clayes Performing Arts Center. (CPAC) 116]</b>. Instructor: Alfred J. Drake, Ph.D. Office hours: Tuesday 10:30-11:25 in <b>[http://www.fullerton.edu/campusmap/images/campus%20map%20color_1008.pdf|University Hall (UH) 329]</b>. Email: <b>[mailto:e222@ajdrake.com|e222@ajdrake.com].</b> Catalog: "Major writers such as Twain, James, Crane, Hemingway, Faulkner, O’Neill, Frost and Elliot. Units: (3)." . I will use +/- grading. The English Dept. may be reached at (657) 278-3163. Students who need special accommodations at the main campus should contact the <b>[http://www.fullerton.edu/disabledservices/|Disabled Student Services Office in UH 101]</b> or call (657) 278-3117; for the Irvine Campus, see <b>[http://www.fullerton.edu/irvinecampus/pages/sa_disabled.asp|Student Affairs, IRVC-159],</b> phone (657) 278-3112. One other required link: <b>[http://www.fullerton.edu/emergencypreparedness/ep_students.html|Emergency Preparedness Guidelines]</b>.
+ <b>COURSE INFORMATION.</b> English 222, Course Code 20799, Section 4. Tuesdays and Thursdays 11:30 a.m.-12:45 p.m., <b>[http://www.fullerton.edu/campusmap/images/campus%20map%20color_1008.pdf| Clayes Performing Arts Center. (CPAC) 116]</b>. Instructor: Alfred J. Drake, Ph.D. Office hours: Tuesday 10:30-11:25 in <b>[http://www.fullerton.edu/campusmap/images/campus%20map%20color_1008.pdf|University Hall (UH) 329]</b>. Email: <b>[mailto:e222@ajdrake.com|e222@ajdrake.com].</b> Catalog: "Major writers such as Twain, James, Crane, Hemingway, Faulkner, O'Neill, Frost and Eliot. Units: (3)." I will use +/- grading. The English Dept. may be reached at (657) 278-3163. Students who need special accommodations at the main campus should contact the <b>[http://www.fullerton.edu/disabledservices/|Disabled Student Services Office in UH 101]</b> or call (657) 278-3117; for the Irvine Campus, see <b>[http://www.fullerton.edu/irvinecampus/pages/sa_disabled.asp|Student Affairs, IRVC-159],</b> phone (657) 278-3112. One other required link: <b>[http://www.fullerton.edu/emergencypreparedness/ep_students.html|Emergency Preparedness Guidelines]</b>.


@@ -Lines: 41-45 changed to +Lines: 41-45 @@

OPTIONAL RESOURCES TO HELP YOU DO WELL


- <b>[http://www.ajdrake.com/wiki/tiki-index.php?page=Blogs_Indices|BROWSE INSTRUCTOR'S BLOG]</b>. My thoughts on the assigned readings.
+ <b>[ http://www.mobydrake.com|VISIT MOBYDRAKE.COM]</b>. My thoughts on the assigned readings will become available as needed at my new American literature blog.


@@ -Lines: 47-66 changed to +Lines: 47-54 @@

- <b>[http://www.ajdrake.com/wiki/tiki-list_file_gallery.php|CHECK OUT RELEVANT ON-SITE STUDY GUIDES]</b>. For this class, best are <b>C17-C16 GUIDES</b> and the <b>WRITING GUIDES</b>.
+ <b>[http://www.ajdrake.com/wiki/tiki-list_file_gallery.php|CHECK OUT RELEVANT ON-SITE STUDY GUIDES]</b> and the <b>WRITING GUIDES</b>.

- <b>((E230_Film_Recs|FILM RECOMMENDATIONS))</b>. The CSUF Library stocks the BBC collection and additional productions; selected DVD's from my own collection will be on library reserve at the Main Campus.<b>VIEW SUPPLEMENTARY BOOK RECOMMENDATIONS</b>. Brief list of recent and older studies on Shakespeare.<b>VIEW SHAKESPEARE RESOURCE CENTER'S GUIDE TO ELIZABETHAN GRAMMAR</b>. This excellent offsite guide covers syntax (word order), key rhetorical devices such as antithesis, and usage shifts aside from offering a limited, searchable glossary.<b>VISIT ALEXANDER SCHMIDT'S ONLINE 1902 SHAKESPEARE LEXICON</b>. Good supplement to the <i>Norton</i> notes. <b>[http://www.ajdrake.com/wiki/tiki-directory_browse.php|BROWSE OFFSITE LINKS]</b>. For this course, most appropriate would be <b>C17-C16 BRITISH LITERATURE LINKS</b>.
+ <b>[http://www.ajdrake.com/wiki/tiki-directory_browse.php|BROWSE OFFSITE LINKS]</b>. For this course, most appropriate would be <b>AMERICAN LITERATURE LINKS</b>.


@@ -Lines: 70-100 changed to +Lines: 58-82 @@

- <b>MAJOR STUDY UNITS AND COURSE OBJECTIVES.</b> This course will cover a selection of Shakespeare's comedies, histories, tragedies and romance plays; the reading list follows that structure. We will pay special attention to Shakespeare's linguistic and rhetorical excellence and to the structure of his plays, but due attention will also be given to cultural and historical background, biography, stage history, acting methods, and other topics as appropriate. Brief segments of film productions may be shown to illustrate key scenes on occasion. Please view a good production of as many of the plays as you can; see <b>((E230_Film_Recs|FILM RECOMMENDATIONS))</b>.
+ <b>MAJOR STUDY UNITS AND COURSE OBJECTIVES.</b> This survey course will cover a selection of American authors from a brief review of Whitman and Dickinson to the post-bellum author Mark Twain to the contemporary playwright and actor Sam Shepard. In sum, the course mainly concerns American literature after the Civil War of 1861-65, and the aim is to offer as broad a perspective as possible on the poetry, drama and fiction of this period, with due attention to relevant historical and social developments. I refrain from superimposing "grand narratives" (i.e. schemes for claiming that all texts in a given period are about or assume "this" or "that"), and prefer to let serendipity guide the emergence of our texts' significance. We will find time along the way to talk about "the South," "modernism," and "post-modernism," but without making those concepts the central fact in our engagement with the readings.

- <b>CLASSROOM ACTIVITIES.</b> Lecture, student presentations, discussion, and a limited number of in-class quizzes, which I may decide to factor in as 5% of the course grade. I encourage questions and comments -- student participation improves any course, broadening its scope and introducing a variety of opinion that wouldn't be available otherwise. We may also do some small-group work. <i>Class sessions improve significantly when students take an active part: I become more spontaneous, remembering to mention things I might have forgotten to say and making new connections.</i> My tasks are to lecture concisely, to listen well, to ask good questions, and to help you find out more about our texts. Your tasks are to listen, respond, and develop your own ideas, your own "voice," as a reader of literary works. In humanities study, insightful interpretation and an ability to make interesting connections are central goals.
+ <b>CLASSROOM ACTIVITIES.</b> Lecture, student presentations, discussion, and possibly a limited number of in-class quizzes, which I may decide to factor in as 5% of the course grade. I encourage questions and comments -- student participation improves any course, broadening its scope and introducing a variety of opinion that wouldn't be available otherwise. <i>Class sessions improve when students take an active part.</i> My tasks are to lecture concisely, to listen well, to ask good questions, and to help you find out more about our texts. Your tasks are to listen, respond, and develop your own ideas, your own voice, as a reader of literary works. In humanities study, insightful interpretation and an ability to make interesting connections are central goals.


HOW YOUR PERFORMANCE WILL BE EVALUATED


- <b>((E222_Presentations_Spr_12|PRESENTATIONS REQUIREMENT: LINK TO FULL INSTRUCTIONS)).</b> At the beginning of the course, students will sign up for one 5-7 minute in-class presentation on a play of their choosing (if possible). I will provide presenters with a specific question to address from among those on the questions page, and a few days after sign-up I will post a schedule on the Presentations page. Each session will feature one or more presentations. <u><i>Required:</i></u> One week in advance of your presentation, email me as full a draft as possible of what you intend to say in class. I will email you back with advice. If I suggest developing the remarks further, email me a revised version at least one day before your in-class presentation. I won't judge students on their rhetorical skills during the presentation, but rather on evidence of prior preparation and consultation as well as on the written draft. <b><u>How to do well on this assignment</u></b>: meet with/email me as required, and send a final written version; good critics challenge and pose questions, so craft your responses to invite discussion; aim for spontaneity and a personal touch: use the question as a springboard rather than a prescription; speak up, but don't rush things. (15% of course grade.)
+ <b>((E222_Presentations_Spr_12|PRESENTATIONS REQUIREMENT: LINK TO FULL INSTRUCTIONS)).</b> At the beginning of the course, students will sign up for one 5-7 minute in-class presentation on an author/text of their choosing (if possible). Several days after sign-up, I will post a schedule on the Presentations page. Each session will feature one or more presentations. <u><i>How to Proceed:</i></u>Work out your own topic to address regarding the author/text I assign you or ask me in person what might be a good topic to develop on that author/text, and at least a week before you are due to present, email me with as full a draft as possible of what you intend to talk about. I will email you back with some advice. If I suggest developing the draft further, email me a revised version at least one day before your in-class presentation. I won't judge students on their in-class rhetorical skills but rather on prior preparation and consultation as well as on the written draft. <b><u>How to do well on this assignment</u></b>: email me as required, and send a final written version. Good critics challenge and pose questions, so craft your responses to invite discussion; aim for spontaneity and a personal touch: use the question as a springboard rather than a prescription; speak up, but don't rush things. (15% of course grade.)

- <b>((E222_Journals_Spr_12|JOURNALS REQUIREMENT: LINK TO FULL INSTRUCTIONS)).</b> Responses to a choice of questions from the study questions page for each play. Four separate journal sets due by email as specified below in the session schedule. Electronic format required. I will not mark journal sets down unless they are late (maximum grade = B), incomplete, or so brief and derivative as to suggest evasion of intellectual labor: they should consist of honest responses to the assigned readings, not "yes-or-no" style answers, quotation of the assigned texts without further comment, or pasted secondary material from Internet sources. <b><u>How to do well on this assignment</u></b>: read instructions; complete entries as you go through each text; send sets on time, making sure I verify receipt; respond with a thoughtful paragraph on each chosen question--use your own words and refer to the texts' specific language. (30% of course grade.)
+ <b>((E222_Journals_Spr_12|JOURNALS REQUIREMENT: LINK TO FULL INSTRUCTIONS)).</b> Keep a running journal on your thoughts about the assigned readings. Four separate journal sets will be due by email as specified below in the session schedule. Electronic format required. I will not mark journal sets down unless they are late (maximum grade = B), incomplete, or so brief and derivative as to suggest evasion of intellectual labor: they should consist of honest responses, not "yes-or-no" style answers, quotation of the assigned texts without further comment, or secondary material pasted from Internet sources. <b><u>How to do well on this assignment</u></b>: read the instructions; complete entries as you go through each text; send sets on time, making sure I verify receipt; respond thoughtfully to the readings: use your own words and refer to the texts' specific language. (30% of course grade.)

- <b>((E222_Paper_Spr_12|TERM PAPER REQUIREMENT: LINK TO FULL INSTRUCTIONS)).</b> <b>By the end of Week 13 (Sunday 4/22) a one-paragraph description addressing the general topic <i>and</i> specific argument of the projected paper will be due by email.</b> (Full rough drafts are also encouraged.) Not providing this description on time may affect the final draft grade. Please read the term paper instructions carefully since they contain the general prompt, suggested topics, and advance draft comments. I reserve the right to require proof of the final paper's authenticity, such as notes or an early draft. Final draft (5-7 pages) due as specified towards the bottom of the syllabus page. There is no need to consider this a research paper, though you are free to make it one. CSUF academic integrity policies apply (see __[http://www.fullerton.edu/senate/PDF/300/UPS300-021.pdf|UPS 300.021]__). See <b>[http://www.library.fullerton.edu/|CSUF Library]</b>. <b><u>How to do well on this assignment</u></b>: send required advance paragraph on time and incorporate advice I send; allow time for revision; proofread and follow <b>MLA formatting and style guidelines</b>; avoid exhaustive coverage and stale generalities: instead, develop a <i>specific, arguable</i> set of claims, demonstrating their strength by showing how they enhance our understanding of <i>specific language, structures, and themes</i>; document your online/print sources; read instructions and take advantage of Resources/Guides/Writing Guides: <b>[http://www.ajdrake.com/wiki/tiki-download_file.php?fileId=7|MLA]</b>, <b>[http://www.ajdrake.com/wiki/tiki-download_file.php?fileId=6|Grammar]</b>, <b>[http://www.ajdrake.com/wiki/tiki-download_file.php?fileId=5|Deductive (see especially)]</b>, <b>[http://www.ajdrake.com/wiki/tiki-download_file.php?fileId=3|Citing]</b>, <b>[http://www.ajdrake.com/wiki/tiki-download_file.php?fileId=1|Analyzing]</b>, and <b>[http://www.ajdrake.com/wiki/tiki-download_file.php?fileId=2|Editing]</b>. (30% of course grade.)
+ <b>((E222_Paper_Spr_12|TERM PAPER REQUIREMENT: LINK TO FULL INSTRUCTIONS)).</b> <b>By the end of Week 13 (Sunday 4/22) a one-paragraph description addressing the general topic <i>and</i> specific argument of the projected paper will be due by email.</b> (Full rough drafts are also encouraged.) Not providing this description on time may affect the final draft grade. Please read the term paper instructions carefully since they contain the general prompt, suggested topics, and advance draft comments. I reserve the right to require proof of the final paper's authenticity, such as notes or an early draft. Final draft (5-7 pages) due as specified towards the bottom of the syllabus page. There is no need to consider this a research paper, though you are free to make it one. CSUF academic integrity policies apply (see __[http://www.fullerton.edu/senate/PDF/300/UPS300-021.pdf|UPS 300.021]__). See <b>[http://www.library.fullerton.edu/|CSUF Library]</b>. <b><u>How to do well on this assignment</u></b>: send required advance paragraph on time and incorporate advice I send; allow time for revision; proofread and follow <b>MLA formatting and style guidelines</b>; avoid exhaustive coverage and stale generalities: instead, develop a <i>specific, arguable</i> set of claims, demonstrating their strength by showing how they enhance our understanding of <i>specific language, structures, and themes</i>; document your online/print sources; read instructions and take advantage of Resources/Guides/Writing Guides: <b>[http://www.ajdrake.com/wiki/tiki-download_file.php?fileId=7|MLA]</b>, <b>[http://www.ajdrake.com/wiki/tiki-download_file.php?fileId=6|Grammar]</b>, <b>[http://www.ajdrake.com/wiki/tiki-download_file.php?fileId=5|Deductive (see especially)]</b>, <b>[http://www.ajdrake.com/wiki/tiki-download_file.php?fileId=3|Citing]</b>, <b>[http://www.ajdrake.com/wiki/tiki-download_file.php?fileId=1|Analyzing]</b>, and <b>[http://www.ajdrake.com/wiki/tiki-download_file.php?fileId=2|Editing]</b>. (30% of course grade.)

- <b>((E222_Exam_Spr_12|FINAL EXAM REQUIREMENT: LINK TO FULL INSTRUCTIONS)).</b> The exam will consist of substantive id passages (33% of exam), mix-and-match questions (match phrase or concept x to speaker/play y; 33% of exam), and key lecture points paired with substantive quotations from the assigned texts (33% of exam). There will be more choices than required responses. Books and notes allowed for all sections, <i>but no laptops</i>. Students may not share books or notes during the exam. Exam date: see below. <b><u>How to do well on this assignment</u></b>: read the online prep. sheet; take good notes and ask questions/make comments; above all, enjoy the works rather than thinking of them only as "test material." If you take pleasure in the assigned texts' language, attend to the sophistication with which they have been structured, and reflect on the intellectual/moral/spiritual value you derive from them, you are likely to earn a good exam grade. (25% of course grade.)
+ <b>((E222_Exam_Spr_12|FINAL EXAM REQUIREMENT: LINK TO FULL INSTRUCTIONS)).</b> The exam will consist of substantive id passages (33% of exam), mix-and-match questions (match phrase or concept x to speaker/play y; 33% of exam), and key lecture points paired with substantive quotations from the assigned texts (33% of exam). There will be more choices than required responses. Books and notes allowed for all sections, <i>but no laptops</i>. Students may not share books or notes during the exam. Exam date: see below. <b><u>How to do well on this assignment</u></b>: read the online prep sheet; take good notes and ask questions/make comments; above all, enjoy the works rather than thinking of them only as test material. If you take pleasure in the assigned texts' language, attend to the sophistication with which they have been structured, and reflect on the intellectual/moral/spiritual value you derive from them, you are likely to earn a good exam grade. (25% of course grade.)


[mailto:e222@ajdrake.com|EMAILING JOURNALS, TERM PAPER, PRESENTATION DRAFTS TO E222@AJDRAKE.COM]. Email journals, presentations, and term paper as attachments. Don't send more than one document in the same email. Label subject lines appropriately: "E222 Journal 1, Jane Smith" etc. You can paste journal sets into a regular email or send them as an attachment. (Journal "sets" include responses to questions about several authors; do not send entries on each author in a given set separately -- responses on the relevant authors should be combined into one document.) Contact me if you don't receive an email confirmation within approximately three days.
-
-
-

STUDY QUESTIONS FOR JOURNALS AND PRESENTATIONS


-
- ((E222_Whitman|Whitman)) | ((E222_Dickinson|Dickinson)) | ((E222_Twain|Twain)) | ((E222_James|James)) | ((E222_Chopin|Chopin)) | ((E222_London|London)) | ((E222_Frost|Frost)) | ((E222_Sandburg|Sandburg)) | ((E222_Williams_W_C|W.C. Williams)) | ((E222_Eliot|Eliot)) | ((E222_Marinetti|Marinetti)) | ((E222_Pound|Pound)) | ((E222_Doolittle|Doolittle)) | ((E222_Moore|Moore)) | ((E222_Stevens|Stevens)) | ((E222_Cummings|Cummings)) | ((E222_Fitzgerald|Fitzgerald)) | ((E222_Hemingway|Hemingway)) | ((E222_Faulkner|Faulkner)) | ((E222_Hughes|Hughes)) | ((E222_Hurston|Hurston)) | ((E222_Williams_T|T. Williams)) | ((E222_Cheever|Cheever)) | ((E222_O’Connor|O’Connor)) | ((E222_Ginsberg|Ginsberg)) | ((E222_Pynchon|Pynchon)) | ((E222_Turner|Turner)) | ((E222_Shepard|Shepard))
-


@@ -Lines: 102-118 changed to +Lines: 84-96 @@

WEEK 1

-
- Note:
-

Tu. 01/24. Course Introduction.

- Th. 01/26. Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson. Whitman’s “When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom’d” (79-85). Dickinson’s “320” (97); “340” (99); “448” (102); “479” (102-03); “591” (103-04); “598” (104); “620” (104); “764” (107); “1263” (108); “1668” (108).
+ Th. 01/26. Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson. Whitman's "When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom'd" (79-85). Dickinson's "320" (97); "340" (99); "448" (102); "479" (102-03); "591" (103-04); "598" (104); "620" (104); "764" (107); "1263" (108); "1668" (108).


WEEK 2


- 130-309, 42 chapters 4 meetings = approx. 180/4 45 pages 60 30 60 30
Tu. 01/31. Mark Twain. Huckleberry Finn (Chapters 1-16, 131-88).

@@ -Lines: 131-138 changed to +Lines: 109-116 @@

WEEK 4


- Tu. 02/14. Henry James. “Daisy Miller” (421-59).
+ Tu. 02/14. Henry James. "Daisy Miller" (421-59). We will also watch part of a film production.

- Th. 02/16. Henry James. “The Beast in the Jungle” (477-506).
+ Th. 02/16. Henry James. "Daisy Miller" (421-59).


@@ -Lines: 150-154 changed to +Lines: 128-132 @@

WEEK 6


- Tu. 02/28. Jack London. From “What Life Means to Me” (Norton 917-20). From <i>Tales of the Pacific</i> (Separate text): "The House of Mapuhi" (31-53); "Mauki (64-79)
+ Tu. 02/28. Jack London. From "What Life Means to Me" (Norton 917-20). From <i>Tales of the Pacific</i> (Separate text): "The House of Mapuhi" (31-53); "Mauki (64-79)


@@ -Lines: 158-173 changed to +Lines: 136-151 @@

WEEK 7


- Tu. 03/06. Robert Frost. “The Figure a Poem Makes” (250-52); “Mowing” (231-32); “Mending Wall” (232-33); “The Death of the Hired Man” (233-37); “The Wood-Pile” (241); “The Road Not Taken” (241-42); “Birches” (242-44); “Out, Out—” (244); “Fire and Ice” (245); “Nothing Gold Can Stay” (245); “Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening” (245); “Desert Places” (246); “Design” (246); “The Gift Outright” (248).
+ Tu. 03/06. Robert Frost. "The Figure a Poem Makes" (250-52); "Mowing" (231-32); "Mending Wall" (232-33); "The Death of the Hired Man" (233-37); "The Wood-Pile" (241); "The Road Not Taken" (241-42); "Birches" (242-44); "Out, Out—" (244); "Fire and Ice" (245); "Nothing Gold Can Stay" (245); "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening" (245); "Desert Places" (246); "Design" (246); "The Gift Outright" (248).

- Th. 03/08. Carl Sandburg and William Carlos Williams. Sandburg’s “Chicago” (279-80); “Fog” (280); “Cool Tombs” (280-81); “Grass” (281). From Williams’ <i>Spring and All</i> (346-47); Poems: “Queen-Anne’s Lace” (305); “Spring and All” (306-07); “To Elsie” (307-09); “The Red Wheelbarrow” (309); “The Dead Baby” (309-10); “This Is Just to Say” (310); “A Sort of a Song” (310); “Landscape with the Fall of Icarus” (313).
+ Th. 03/08. Carl Sandburg and William Carlos Williams. Sandburg's "Chicago" (279-80); "Fog" (280); "Cool Tombs" (280-81); "Grass" (281). From Williams' <i>Spring and All</i> (346-47); Poems: "Queen-Anne's Lace" (305); "Spring and All" (306-07); "To Elsie" (307-09); "The Red Wheelbarrow" (309); "The Dead Baby" (309-10); "This Is Just to Say" (310); "A Sort of a Song" (310); "Landscape with the Fall of Icarus" (313).


WEEK 8


- Tu. 03/13. T. S. Eliot. From “Tradition and the Individual Talent” (372-75); “The Waste Land” (378-91).
+ Tu. 03/13. T. S. Eliot. From "Tradition and the Individual Talent" (372-75); "The Waste Land" (378-91).

- Th. 03/15. F.T. Marinetti, Ezra Pound, H.D., Marianne Moore, Wallace Stevens, E.E. Cummings. From Marinetti’s “Manifesto of Futurism” (337). From Pound’s “A Retrospect”(341-43). H.D.’s “Leda” (353); “Fragment 113” (354); “Helen” (355). Moore’s “Poetry” (359-60); “To a Snail” (360). Stevens’ “Anecdote of the Jar” (288); “Thirteen Ways of Looking at a Blackbird” (291-92); “The Idea of Order at Key West” (293-94); “Of Modern Poetry” (294). E.E. Cummings’ “in Just-” (638); “the Cambridge ladies â¦â€ (640); “next to of course god america i” (641); “i sing of Olaf glad and big” (641-42); “anyone lived in a pretty how town” (643-44).
+ Th. 03/15. F.T. Marinetti, Ezra Pound, H.D., Marianne Moore, Wallace Stevens, E.E. Cummings. From Marinetti's "Manifesto of Futurism" (337). From Pound's "A Retrospect"(341-43). H.D.'s "Leda" (353); "Fragment 113" (354); "Helen" (355). Moore's "Poetry" (359-60); "To a Snail" (360). Stevens' "Anecdote of the Jar" (288); "Thirteen Ways of Looking at a Blackbird" (291-92); "The Idea of Order at Key West" (293-94); "Of Modern Poetry" (294). E.E. Cummings' "in Just-" (638); "the Cambridge ladies …" (640); "next to of course god america i" (641); "i sing of Olaf glad and big" (641-42); "anyone lived in a pretty how town" (643-44).


@@ -Lines: 177-181 changed to +Lines: 155-159 @@

WEEK 9


- Tu. 03/20. F. Scott Fitzgerald. “Winter Dreams” (659-75); "Babylon Revisited" (675-89).
+ Tu. 03/20. Ernest Hemingway. "The Snows of Kilimanjaro" (826-42). We will watch part of a film production.


@@ -Lines: 201-208 changed to +Lines: 179-186 @@

WEEK 12


- Tu. 04/10. Langston Hughes. From “The Negro Artist and the Racial Mountain” (348-50); All Poems (871-80): “The Negro Speaks of Rivers” (871); “Mother to Son” (871-72); “I, Too” (872); “The Weary Blues” (872-73); “Mulatto” (873-74); “Song for a Dark Girl” (874-75); “Genius Child” (875); “Visitors to the Black Belt” (875-76); “Note on Commercial Theatre” (876); “Vagabonds” (876-77); “Words Like Freedom” (877); “Madam and Her Madam” (877-78); “Freedom {1}” (878); “Madam’s Calling Cards” (878-79); “Silhouette” (879); “Theme for English B” (880).
+ Tu. 04/10. Langston Hughes. From "The Negro Artist and the Racial Mountain" (348-50); All Poems (871-80): "The Negro Speaks of Rivers" (871); "Mother to Son" (871-72); "I, Too" (872); "The Weary Blues" (872-73); "Mulatto" (873-74); "Song for a Dark Girl" (874-75); "Genius Child" (875); "Visitors to the Black Belt" (875-76); "Note on Commercial Theatre" (876); "Vagabonds" (876-77); "Words Like Freedom" (877); "Madam and Her Madam" (877-78); "Freedom {1}" (878); "Madam's Calling Cards" (878-79); "Silhouette" (879); "Theme for English B" (880).

- Th. 04/12. Zora Neale Hurston. “The Eatonville Anthology” (530-38); “How It Feels to Be Colored Me” (538-41); “The Gilded Six-Bits” (541-49).
+ Th. 04/12. Zora Neale Hurston. "The Eatonville Anthology" (530-38); "How It Feels to Be Colored Me" (538-41); "The Gilded Six-Bits" (541-49).


@@ -Lines: 223-243 changed to +Lines: 201-221 @@

WEEK 14


- Tu. 04/24. John Cheever. “The Swimmer” (157-65).
+ Tu. 04/24. John Cheever. "The Swimmer" (157-65).

- Th. 04/26. Allen Ginsberg. “Howl” (492-500); “Footnote to Howl” (500); “A Supermarket in California” (500); “Sunflower Sutra” (501); “To Aunt Rose” (503); “On Burroughs’ Work (504); “Ego Confession” (505).
+ Th. 04/26. Allen Ginsberg. "Howl" (492-500); "Footnote to Howl" (500); "A Supermarket in California" (500); "Sunflower Sutra" (501); "To Aunt Rose" (503); "On Burroughs' Work (504); "Ego Confession" (505).


WEEK 15


- Tu. 05/01. Flannery O’Connor. “The Life You Save May Be Your Own” (437-44); “Good Country People” (445-58).
+ Tu. 05/01. Flannery O'Connor. "The Life You Save May Be Your Own" (437-44); "Good Country People" (445-58).

- Th. 05/03. Thomas Pynchon. “Entropy” (725-36).
+ Th. 05/03. Thomas Pynchon. "Entropy" (725-36).


WEEK 16


- Tu. 05/08. Frederick Jackson Turner. From “The Significance of the Frontier in American History” (1133-37). Sam Shepard. <i>True West</i> (Act 1, 870-887).
+ Tu. 05/08. Frederick Jackson Turner. From "The Significance of the Frontier in American History" (1133-37). Sam Shepard. <i>True West</i> (Act 1, 870-887).


@@ -Lines: 250-255 changed to +Lines: 228-232 @@

FINALS WEEK


- Final Exam Date <b>TBD.</b> Due by email by TBD: <b>((E222_Paper_Spr_12|Term Paper))</b>. (I must turn in grades by May 25, 2011.) For your other courses, check <b>[http://www.fullerton.edu/admissions/CurrentStudent/FinalExaminations.asp|CSUF's Final Exam Schedule]</b>.
+ Final Exam Date <b>Thursday May 17, 12:00-1:50.</b> Due by email by Saturday, May 19: <b>((E222_Paper_Spr_12|Term Paper))</b>. (I must turn in grades by May 25, 2011.) For your other courses, check <b>[http://www.fullerton.edu/admissions/CurrentStudent/FinalExaminations.asp|CSUF's Final Exam Schedule]</b>.


History

Legend: v=view , c=compare, d=diff
Information Version Html Action
Mon 23 Jan, 2012 03:39 PM PST by admin_main from 76.174.123.110 7
Current
Html v
Mon 23 Jan, 2012 03:39 PM PST by admin_main from 76.174.123.110 7 Html v  c  d
Mon 23 Jan, 2012 03:35 PM PST by admin_main from 76.174.123.110 6 Html v  c  d
Mon 23 Jan, 2012 03:33 PM PST by admin_main from 76.174.123.110 5 Html v  c  d
Fri 13 Jan, 2012 04:08 PM PST by admin_main from 76.174.123.10 4 Html v  c  d
Wed 21 Dec, 2011 07:22 PM PST by admin_main from 76.91.151.49 3 Html v  c  d
Wed 21 Dec, 2011 07:21 PM PST by admin_main from 76.91.151.49 2 Html v  c  d

Archive Menu

Magnet Academy

Google Search

 
www.ajdrake.com
WWW