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History: E300_Journals_Fall_14

Comparing version 1 with version 2

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JOURNAL SET 3: DRAMA (Due by email exam day – by midnight or so of that day, after the exam)


- <b><b>((E300_Questions_Drama_Sophocles_Fall_14|Questions on Drama: Sophocles))</b>: (4 questions)
+ <b>((E300_Questions_Drama_Sophocles_Fall_14|Questions on Drama: Sophocles))</b>: (4 questions)
- ((E300_Questions_Drama_Shakespeare_Fall_14|Questions on Drama: Shakespeare)): (4 questions spanning three acts)
+ ((E300_Questions_Drama_Shakespeare_Fall_14|Questions on Drama: Shakespeare)): (4 questions spanning three acts)
- ((E300_Questions_Drama_Wilde_Fall_14|Questions on Drama: Wilde)): (4 questions)
+ ((E300_Questions_Drama_Wilde_Fall_14|Questions on Drama: Wilde)): (4 questions)
- <b><b>((E300_Questions_Drama_Hansberry_Fall_14|Questions on Drama: Hansberry))</b>: (4 questions)
+ <b>((E300_Questions_Drama_Hansberry_Fall_14|Questions on Drama: Hansberry))</b>: (4 questions)


@@ -Lines: 83-87 changed to +Lines: 84-88 @@

HOW TO WRITE A GOOD JOURNAL RESPONSE


- Perhaps the key thing to note here is that I keep using the word ''response'' rather than ''answer.'' That is by design -- although no doubt some of my questions can be "answered" straightforwardly, it's always best to base your response on your own interpretation of the question and your own estimation of the value of the material it covers. I like specific, thoughtful responses -- not pat answers or "say anything" vague remarks. The study questions should help you develop ideas for papers, participate in discussions, and learn more from class sessions -- they can only help you in these ways if you make the most of your time in keeping journals. Responses will vary in length to suit the questions, but many responses will require a short paragraph. There's no need to respond exhaustively -- just thoughtfully. Here are some sample responses for various kinds of material:
+ Perhaps the key thing to note here is that I keep using the word <i>response</i> rather than <i>answer.</i> That is by design -- although no doubt some of my questions can be "answered" straightforwardly, it's always best to base your response on your own interpretation of the question and your own estimation of the value of the material it covers. I like specific, thoughtful responses -- not pat answers or "say anything" vague remarks. The study questions should help you develop ideas for papers, participate in discussions, and learn more from class sessions -- they can only help you in these ways if you make the most of your time in keeping journals. Responses will vary in length to suit the questions, but many responses will require a short paragraph. There's no need to respond exhaustively -- just thoughtfully. Here are some sample responses for various kinds of material:


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