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History: E316_TR_Syllabus_Fall_11

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- <h3>^-=SYLLABUS FOR E316 TR SHAKESPEARE, CSU FULLERTON FALL 2011 (08/21/11)=-^
+ <h3>^-=SYLLABUS FOR E316 TR SHAKESPEARE, CSU FULLERTON FALL 2011 (08/22/11)=-^


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- <b>CLASSROOM ACTIVITIES.</b> Lecture, student presentations, discussion, and a limited number of in-class quizzes. I encourage questions and comments -- student participation improves any course, broadening its scope and introducing a variety of opinion that wouldn't be available otherwise. We may also do some small-group work. <i>Class sessions improve significantly when students take an active part: I become more spontaneous, remembering to mention things I might have forgotten to say and making new connections.</i> My tasks are to lecture concisely, to listen well, to ask good questions, and to help you find out more about our texts. Your tasks are to listen, respond, and develop your own ideas, your own "voice," as a reader of literary works. In humanities study, insightful interpretation and an ability to make interesting connections are central goals.
+ <b>CLASSROOM ACTIVITIES.</b> Lecture, student presentations, discussion, and a limited number of in-class quizzes, which I may decide to factor in as 5% of the course grade. I encourage questions and comments -- student participation improves any course, broadening its scope and introducing a variety of opinion that wouldn't be available otherwise. We may also do some small-group work. <i>Class sessions improve significantly when students take an active part: I become more spontaneous, remembering to mention things I might have forgotten to say and making new connections.</i> My tasks are to lecture concisely, to listen well, to ask good questions, and to help you find out more about our texts. Your tasks are to listen, respond, and develop your own ideas, your own "voice," as a reader of literary works. In humanities study, insightful interpretation and an ability to make interesting connections are central goals.


HOW YOUR PERFORMANCE WILL BE EVALUATED


- <b>((E316_TR_Presentations_Fall_11|PRESENTATIONS REQUIREMENT: LINK TO FULL INSTRUCTIONS)).</b> At the beginning of the course, students will sign up for one 5-7 minute in-class presentation on a play of their choosing (if possible). I will provide presenters with a specific question to address from among those on the questions page, and a few days after sign-up I will post a schedule on the Presentations page. Each session will feature one or more presentations. <u><i>Required:</i></u> One week in advance of your presentation, email me as full a draft as possible of what you intend to say in class. I will email you back with advice. If I suggest developing the remarks further, email me a revised version at least one day before your in-class presentation. I won't judge students on their rhetorical skills during the presentation, but rather on evidence of prior preparation and consultation as well as on the written draft. <b><u>How to do well on this assignment</u></b>: meet with/email me as required, and send a final written version; good critics challenge and pose questions, so craft your responses to invite discussion; aim for spontaneity and a personal touch: use the question as a springboard rather than a prescription; speak up, but don't rush things. (20% of course grade.)
+ <b>((E316_TR_Presentations_Fall_11|PRESENTATIONS REQUIREMENT: LINK TO FULL INSTRUCTIONS)).</b> At the beginning of the course, students will sign up for one 5-7 minute in-class presentation on a play of their choosing (if possible). I will provide presenters with a specific question to address from among those on the questions page, and a few days after sign-up I will post a schedule on the Presentations page. Each session will feature one or more presentations. <u><i>Required:</i></u> One week in advance of your presentation, email me as full a draft as possible of what you intend to say in class. I will email you back with advice. If I suggest developing the remarks further, email me a revised version at least one day before your in-class presentation. I won't judge students on their rhetorical skills during the presentation, but rather on evidence of prior preparation and consultation as well as on the written draft. <b><u>How to do well on this assignment</u></b>: meet with/email me as required, and send a final written version; good critics challenge and pose questions, so craft your responses to invite discussion; aim for spontaneity and a personal touch: use the question as a springboard rather than a prescription; speak up, but don't rush things. (15% of course grade.)


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- <b>((E316_TR_Exam_Fall_11|FINAL EXAM REQUIREMENT: LINK TO FULL INSTRUCTIONS)).</b> The exam will consist of substantive id passages (33% of exam), mix-and-match questions (match phrase or concept x to speaker/play y; 33% of exam), and key lecture points paired with substantive quotations from the assigned texts (33% of exam). There will be more choices than required responses. Books and notes allowed for all sections, <i>but no laptops</i>. Students may not share books or notes during the exam. Exam date: see below. <b><u>How to do well on this assignment</u></b>: read the online prep. sheet; take good notes and ask questions/make comments; above all, enjoy the works rather than thinking of them only as "test material." If you take pleasure in the assigned texts' language, attend to the sophistication with which they have been structured, and reflect on the intellectual/moral/spiritual value you derive from them, you are likely to earn a good exam grade. (2% of course grade.)
+ <b>((E316_TR_Exam_Fall_11|FINAL EXAM REQUIREMENT: LINK TO FULL INSTRUCTIONS)).</b> The exam will consist of substantive id passages (33% of exam), mix-and-match questions (match phrase or concept x to speaker/play y; 33% of exam), and key lecture points paired with substantive quotations from the assigned texts (33% of exam). There will be more choices than required responses. Books and notes allowed for all sections, <i>but no laptops</i>. Students may not share books or notes during the exam. Exam date: see below. <b><u>How to do well on this assignment</u></b>: read the online prep. sheet; take good notes and ask questions/make comments; above all, enjoy the works rather than thinking of them only as "test material." If you take pleasure in the assigned texts' language, attend to the sophistication with which they have been structured, and reflect on the intellectual/moral/spiritual value you derive from them, you are likely to earn a good exam grade. (25% of course grade.)


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