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History: E317_Exam_Spr_13

Comparing version 2 with version 3

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- <h3>^-=JOURNALS FOR E317 MILTON, CSU FULLERTON SPRING 2013 (1/28/13)=-^
+ <h3>^-=EXAM PREPARATION GUIDE FOR E317 MILTON, CSU FULLERTON SPRING 2013 (1/29/13)=-^


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- <b><i>SECTION 1: PASSAGE IDENTIFICATION.</i></b> Identifying author (where relevant) and title for substantive passages. The purpose of this section is <u>to test for <i>simple recall</i></u>: you just have to know which author wrote the passage and in which assigned reading. If this is a <i>single-author course,</i> I will ask for identification of the <i>speaker and text</i> rather than the author. This section calls for you to be familiar with an authors' stylistic habits and preferred forms (blank verse, heroic couplets, etc.), turns of thought, mannerisms, general orientation or outlook, and other distinguishing features; you must know the main events and characters of a novel or short story, the central subject/s and/or actions of a given poem, the key tenets held and concerns set forth in a given prose piece. I try to choose passages that are neither too easily identifiable (i.e. that serve up the names of main characters or contain the title) nor lacking in significance with regard to the author or work in question. <u>Examples</u>: if I want to see whether you've read Joyce's <i>A Portrait</i> closely, I might choose a passage of several lines from the fiery sermon that convinces young Stephen temporarily to give up his sinful ways. This is an important part of the novel, and the sermon is hard to forget. If I want to check your recall of Hopkins, I might choose high-impact lines that show off some features of that poet's style: difficult, unusual words, references to theology (Hopkins was a Jesuit priest), and frequent alliteration and internal rhyme. If I want to test your recall of Wordsworth's poetical theory in his Preface to <i>Lyrical Ballads,</i> I might set down a passage that contains one of his noteworthy observations about the purpose of poetry and/or about how poetry is created. Wordsworth may write in a flowing eighteenth-century style, but he knows how to drive home a point with a memorable phrase. With regard to a Shakespeare play, say <i>Macbeth,</i> I might include a passage spoken by the witches when Macbeth returns to them a second time for further insight, or perhaps something memorable by Lady Macbeth when she convinces her husband to kill his unsuspecting guest King Duncan. The bottom line is that while "simple recall" is all that's required for this section, only reading texts with an eye for style and significance will lead to correct responses: "reading for information" or mere scanning without interest won't help much. A semester-long habit of <u>underlining</u> or <b>HIGHLIGHTING KEY PASSAGES</b> will help greatly, as will making concise margin-notes at important points in the texts.
+ <b><i>SECTION 1: PASSAGE IDENTIFICATION.</i></b> Identifying author (where relevant) and speaker/text title for substantive passages. The purpose of this section is <u>to test for <i>simple recall</i></u>: you just have to know which author wrote the passage, and in which assigned reading. If this is a <i>single-author course,</i> I will ask for identification of the <i>speaker and text</i> rather than the author. This section calls for you to be familiar with an authors' stylistic habits and preferred forms (blank verse, heroic couplets, etc.), turns of thought, mannerisms, general orientation or outlook, and other distinguishing features; you must know the main events and characters of a novel or short story, the central subject/s and/or actions of a given poem, the key tenets held and concerns set forth in a given prose piece. I try to choose passages that are neither too easily identifiable (i.e. that serve up the names of main characters or contain the title) nor lacking in significance with regard to the author or work in question. <u>Examples</u>: if I want to see whether you've read Joyce's <i>A Portrait</i> closely, I might choose a passage of several lines from the fiery sermon that convinces young Stephen temporarily to give up his sinful ways. This is an important part of the novel, and the sermon is hard to forget. If I want to check your recall of Hopkins, I might choose high-impact lines that show off some features of that poet's style: difficult, unusual words, references to theology (Hopkins was a Jesuit priest), and frequent alliteration and internal rhyme. If I want to test your recall of Wordsworth's poetical theory in his Preface to <i>Lyrical Ballads,</i> I might set down a passage that contains one of his noteworthy observations about the purpose of poetry and/or about how poetry is created. Wordsworth may write in a flowing eighteenth-century style, but he knows how to drive home a point with a memorable phrase. With regard to a Shakespeare play, say <i>Macbeth,</i> I might include a passage spoken by the witches when Macbeth returns to them a second time for further insight, or perhaps something memorable by Lady Macbeth when she convinces her husband to kill his unsuspecting guest King Duncan. The bottom line is that while "simple recall" is all that's required for this section, only reading texts with an eye for style and significance will lead to correct responses: "reading for information" or mere scanning without interest won't help much. A semester-long habit of <u>underlining</u> or <b>HIGHLIGHTING KEY PASSAGES</b> will help greatly, as will making concise margin-notes at important points in the texts.


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- <b><i>SECTION 3: KEY POINTS FROM CLASS SESSIONS AND TEXTBOOK INTRODUCTIONS.</i></b> Matching key points made during class sessions (by me or others, whether your fellow students or literary critics I may have mentioned) with quotations from the assigned works that illustrate or evoke those points. Material from assigned textbook introductions may also be factored in when I write the questions for this section. In a Shakespeare course, for example, I might write a sentence or two reminding you about Samuel Taylor Coleridge's view of Hamlet as a quasi-romantic figure, a man whose tragedy is at least partly that his superior mind and emotional sensitivity render him incapable of taking revenge. (This reading is somewhat flawed, but it is worth considering and is something I would surely bring up in class.) You would then need to match the criticism-based statement with a passage that I have chosen to place in the right-hand column, or, depending on how I format this section, among other passages from the plays. Or in a modern British literature survey, I might write a sentence or two evoking an in-class discussion of the Decadent movement's rejection of mimetic representation (i.e. the sort of artistic representation that tries to reproduce or imitate the sights, sounds, and behavior on display in real life), which you would then need to pair with the appropriate passage from an assigned reading, most likely something from Oscar Wilde or another late-nineteenth-century author. This section is perhaps best understood as a more detailed and sophisticated version of the exam's second section, and as such it asks you to recall key concepts we discussed in class and connect them to passages from the texts we will have read. In sum, this section rewards students who have taken good notes, reviewed them, and reflected upon them over the course of the semester.
+ <b><i>SECTION 3: KEY POINTS FROM CLASS SESSIONS AND TEXTBOOK INTRODUCTIONS.</i></b> Matching key points made during class sessions (by me or others, whether your fellow students or literary critics I may have mentioned) with quotations from the assigned works that illustrate or evoke those points. Material from assigned textbook introductions may also be factored in when I write the questions for this section. In a Shakespeare course, for example, I might write a sentence or two reminding you about Samuel Taylor Coleridge's view of Hamlet as a quasi-romantic figure, a man whose tragedy is at least partly that his superior mind and emotional sensitivity render him incapable of taking revenge. (This reading is somewhat flawed, but it is worth considering and is something I would surely bring up in class.) You would then need to match the criticism-based statement with a passage that I have chosen to place in the right-hand column, or, depending on how I format this section, among other passages from the texts. Or in a modern British literature survey, I might write a sentence or two evoking an in-class discussion of the Decadent movement's rejection of mimetic representation (i.e. the sort of artistic representation that tries to reproduce or imitate the sights, sounds, and behavior on display in real life), which you would then need to pair with the appropriate passage from an assigned reading, most likely something from Oscar Wilde or another late-nineteenth-century author. This section is perhaps best understood as a more detailed and sophisticated version of the exam's second section, and as such it asks you to recall key concepts we discussed in class and connect them to passages from the texts we will have read. In sum, this section rewards students who have taken good notes, reviewed them, and reflected upon them over the course of the semester.


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