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SYLLABUS FOR E430 SHAKESPEARE'S COMEDIES AND HISTORIES, CHAPMAN U FALL 2009 (10/24/10)

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BASIC INFORMATION

Course Information. English 430. T/Th. 2:30-3:45 p.m. Location: Argyros Forum 206C (AF). Instructor: Alfred J. Drake, Ph.D. Office hours: 1:20-2:20 in Cyber Cafe (Beckman Hall, 1st. floor). e430@ajdrake.com. Catalog: "Prerequisites, ENG 301 or HIST 308, or TH 316. Advanced study of approximately 10 of Shakespeare's comedies and histories with attention to their literary, historical, and cultural contexts. This course can be used to satisfy the pre-1850 distribution requirements for English majors. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits." The English Dept. is located in Wilkinson 217 and the administrative staff may be reached at engdept@chapman.edu or by phone: (714) 997-6750.

Required Texts at the Chapman U Bookstore

Evans, G. Blakemore et al., eds. The Riverside Shakespeare. 2nd edition. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1997. ISBN: 0-395-75490-9. Please note that if you already have the Norton or the Bevington Shakespeare editions, you may use them instead -- all three offer the depth of notes vital to an edition of Shakespeare.

OPTIONAL RESOURCES TO HELP YOU DO WELL

BROWSE INSTRUCTOR'S BLOG AND COLLECTIVE STUDENT BLOG (Not available after course ends). My thoughts on the assigned readings; separately, I will post a running blog with written versions of students' in-class presentations.

LISTEN TO OUR CLASS SESSIONS IN MP3 AUDIO. Audio becomes available a day or two after each session.

CHECK OUT RELEVANT ON-SITE STUDY GUIDES. For this class, best are C17-C16 GUIDES and the WRITING GUIDES.

VIEW SUPPLEMENTARY BOOK RECOMMENDATIONS. Brief list of recent and older studies on Shakespeare.

VIEW SHAKESPEARE RESOURCE CENTER'S GUIDE TO ELIZABETHAN GRAMMAR. This excellent offsite guide covers syntax (word order), key rhetorical devices such as antithesis, and usage shifts aside from offering a limited, searchable glossary.

VISIT ALEXANDER SCHMIDT'S ONLINE 1902 SHAKESPEARE LEXICON. Good supplement to the Norton notes.

BROWSE OFFSITE LINKS. For this course, most appropriate would be C17-C16 BRITISH LITERATURE LINKS.

COURSE RATIONALE AND PLAN

COURSE POLICIES. Please review the Course Policies Page early in the semester. Key points easily stated here: missing more than 20% of sessions may affect course grade; academic dishonesty may result in course failure. The four evaluative requirements outlined below must be substantially completed to pass the course. Since most assignments will be due by email, it is students' responsibility to contact me promptly if they do not get an email verifying receipt of materials.

MAJOR STUDY UNITS AND COURSE OBJECTIVES. This course will cover a selection of Shakespeare's comedies and history plays. We will pay special attention to Shakespeare's linguistic and rhetorical excellence and to the structure of his plays, but due attention will also be given to cultural and historical background, biography, stage history, acting methods, and other topics as appropriate. Brief segments of film productions may be shown to illustrate key scenes on occasion. Please view a good production of as many of the plays as you can. Here are my Film Recommendations. The library stocks the BBC collection and additional productions; selected DVD's from my own collection will be on Library reserve.

CLASSROOM ACTIVITIES. Lecture, student presentations, discussion, and a limited number of in-class quizzes. I encourage questions and comments -- student participation improves any course, broadening its scope and introducing a variety of opinion that wouldn't be available otherwise. We may also do some small-group work. Class sessions improve significantly when students take an active part: I become more spontaneous, remembering to mention things I might have forgotten to say and making new connections. My tasks are to lecture concisely, to listen well, to ask good questions, and to help you find out more about our texts. Your tasks are to listen, respond, and develop your own ideas, your own voice, as a reader of literary works. In humanities study, insightful interpretation and an ability to make interesting connections are central goals.

HOW YOUR PERFORMANCE WILL BE EVALUATED

Course Policies. Please review early in the semester.

Presentations Requirement: Link to Full Instructions. At the beginning of the course, students will sign up for two to four (depending on class size) five-minute in-class presentations on plays of their choosing (if possible). I will provide presenters with specific questions to address (from among those on the questions pages) and within a few days after sign-up I will post a schedule on the Presentations page. Each session will feature several presentations. Required: Several days before you present, email me as full a draft as possible of what you intend to say in class. I will email you back with advice. I will post your original draft to the students' blog for this course, but if in my comments I suggested developing the remarks further, you should also send me a revised version within one week after your in-class presentation so that I can post the new version. Other students may, if they wish, access the written entries as they're added by visiting the appropriately named link on the Course Blogs Index Page. 20% of course grade.

Journals Requirement: Link to Full Instructions. Responses to a choice of questions from the study questions page for each play. Three separate journal sets due by email as specified below in the reading schedule. Electronic format required. (30%)

Term Paper Requirement: Link to Full Instructions. By the end of Week 12 (Sunday, 11/22) a one-paragraph description addressing the topic and argument of the projected paper will be due by email. (Full rough drafts are also encouraged.) Not providing this description on time may affect the final draft grade. Please read the term paper instructions carefully since they contain the general prompt, suggested topics, and advance draft comments. I reserve the right to require proof of the final paper's authenticity, such as notes or an early draft. Final draft (5-7 pages) due as specified towards the bottom of the syllabus page. Follow MLA (Modern Language Association) guidelines. See Chapman Library. See Resources/Guides/Writing Guides: MLA, Grammar, Deductive, Citing, Analyzing, and Editing. (30%)

Final Exam Requirement: Link to Full Instructions. The exam will consist of substantive id passages, mix-and-match questions (match phrase or concept x to author/text y), and essay and/or short-essay questions. There will be more choices than required responses. Books and notes allowed for all sections, but no laptops. Students may not share books or notes during the exam. Exam date: see below. (20%)

Emailing Journals/Paper/Presentations to e430 at ajdrake.com. Email journals, presentations, and term paper as attachments. Don't send more than one document in the same email. Label subject lines appropriately: "E430 Journal 1, Jane Smith" etc. You can paste journal sets into a regular email or send them as an attachment. (Journal "sets" include responses to questions about several authors; do not send entries on each author in a given set separately. Responses on the relevant authors should be combined into one document.) Contact me if you don't receive an email confirmation within approximately three days.

STUDY QUESTIONS FOR JOURNALS AND PRESENTATIONS

Questions: Taming of the Shrew | King Richard the Third | Midsummer Night's Dream | Merchant of Venice | Henry the Fourth, Part 1 | Henry the Fourth, Part 2 | Much Ado about Nothing | Twelfth Night | Troilus and Cressida | Measure for Measure

LECTURE SCHEDULE: WE WILL DISCUSS THE FOLLOWING WORKS ON THE DATES INDICATED

WEEK 1

Tu. 09/01. Course introduction.

Th. 09/03. The Taming of the Shrew (Film Highlights, BBC). Chronology: 1593-94.

WEEK 2

Tu. 09/08. The Taming of the Shrew (Acts 1-3, pages 142-60). Chronology: 1593-94.

Th. 09/10. The Taming of the Shrew (Acts 4-5, Pages 160-71). Chronology: 1593-94.

WEEK 3

Tu. 09/15. The Tragedy of King Richard the Third (Film Highlights, Ian McKellen). Chronology: 1592-93.

Th. 09/17. The Tragedy of King Richard the Third (Acts 1-2, pages 752-69). Chronology: 1592-93.

WEEK 4

Tu. 09/22. The Tragedy of King Richard the Third (Acts 3-5, pages 769-94). Chronology: 1592-93.

Th. 09/24. A Midsummer Night's Dream (Film Highlights, Adrian Noble's RSC). Chronology: 1595-96.

WEEK 5

Tu. 09/29. A Midsummer Night's Dream (Acts 1-3, pages 256-72). Chronology: 1595-96.

Th. 10/01. A Midsummer Night's Dream (Acts 4-5, pages 272-80). Chronology: 1595-96. Journal Set 1 Due by Email by Sunday, 10/04

WEEK 6

Tu. 10/06. The Merchant of Venice (Film Highlights, Radford). Chronology: 1596-97.

Th. 10/08. The Merchant of Venice (Acts 1-2, pages 288-301). Chronology: 1596-97.

WEEK 7

Tu. 10/13. The Merchant of Venice (Acts 3-5, pages 301-17). Chronology: 1596-97.

Th. 10/15. The First Part of Henry the Fourth (Film Highlights, BBC). Chronology: 1596-97.

WEEK 8

Tu. 10/20. The First Part of Henry the Fourth (Acts 1-3, pages 889-913). Chronology: 1596-97.

Th. 10/22. The First Part of Henry the Fourth (Acts 4-5, pages 913-23). Chronology: 1596-97.

WEEK 9

Tu. 10/27. The Second Part of Henry the Fourth (Acts 1-3, pages 928-49). Chronology: 1598.

Th. 10/29. The Second Part of Henry the Fourth (Acts 4-5, pages 949-65). Chronology: 1598. Journal Set 2 Due by Email by Sunday, 11/01

WEEK 10

Tu. 11/03. Much Ado about Nothing (Film Highlights, K. Branagh). Chronology: 1598-99.

Th. 11/05. Much Ado about Nothing (Acts 1-2, pages 366-78). Chronology: 1598-99.

WEEK 11

Tu. 11/10. Much Ado about Nothing (Acts 3-5, pages 378-96). Chronology: 1598-99.

Th. 11/12. Twelfth Night, or What You Will (Film Highlights, Trevor Nunn). Chronology: 1601-02.

WEEK 12

Tu. 11/17. Twelfth Night, or What You Will (Acts 1-3, pages 442-66). Chronology: 1601-02.

Th. 11/19. Twelfth Night, or What You Will (Acts 4-5, pages 466-74). Chronology: 1601-02. Paragraph on paper topic and argument due by Sunday, 11/22.

WEEK 13

Tu. 11/24. The History of Troilus and Cressida (Film Highlights, BBC). Chronology: 1601-02.

Th. 11/26. No classes -- Thanksgiving Holiday.

WEEK 14

Tu. 12/01. The History of Troilus and Cressida (Acts 1-3, pages 482-508). Chronology: 1601-02.

Th. 12/03. The History of Troilus and Cressida (Acts 4-5, pages 509-525). Chronology: 1601-02.

WEEK 15

Tu. 12/08. Measure for Measure (Acts 1-3, pages 584-606). Chronology: 1604.

Th. 12/10. Measure for Measure (Acts 4-5, pages 606-18). Chronology: 1604. Journal Set 3 Due by Email by Sunday, 12/13.

FINALS WEEK

Final Exam Date: Wed., Dec. 16, 1:30-4:00. Due by Sunday, Dec. 20: Term Paper. I must turn in grades by Sunday, Dec. 27. For your other courses, check the Fall 2009 Chapman Final Exam Schedule.


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