Sample Journal Formatting for All Classes

Sample Journal Set Formatting

FORMATTING SAMPLE FOR JOURNAL ENTRIES
Email | Home | Syllabus | Policies | Questions | Presentations
Journals | Paper | Final | Blogs | Audio | Guides | Links

STUDENT X, E212 JOURNAL SET 1, BLAKE THROUGH JANE AUSTEN

WILLIAM BLAKE (5 Questions)

Songs of Innocence & of Experience

"The Echoing Green." (from Innocence)

7. What interpretation of the passage of time does the child provide? In other words, how does the child-speaker view the cessation of play and the coming on of night? Does the child welcome the nightfall? If so, why?

The quick brown Blakean fox jumped over the lazy Joshua Reynolds dog. The quick brown Blakean fox jumped over the lazy Joshua Reynolds dog. The quick brown Blakean fox jumped over the lazy Joshua Reynolds dog. The quick brown Blakean fox jumped over the lazy Joshua Reynolds dog. The quick brown Blakean fox jumped over the lazy Joshua Reynolds dog. The quick brown Blakean fox jumped over the lazy Joshua Reynolds dog. The quick brown Blakean fox jumped over the lazy Joshua Reynolds dog.

"The Chimney Sweeper" (from Innocence)

11. Why does the child-speaker interpret his situation -- practically a form of industrial-age slavery -- in a positive light? Does the content of his narration undercut his innocent trust in God?

The quick brown Blakean fox jumped over the lazy Joshua Reynolds dog. The quick brown Blakean fox jumped over the lazy Joshua Reynolds dog. The quick brown Blakean fox jumped over the lazy Joshua Reynolds dog. The quick brown Blakean fox jumped over the lazy Joshua Reynolds dog. The quick brown Blakean fox jumped over the lazy Joshua Reynolds dog. The quick brown Blakean fox jumped over the lazy Joshua Reynolds dog.

"Holy Thursday" (from Innocence)

14. How does the speaker describe the movements of the children? Is this description ambivalent, and is the poem as a whole less innocent-sounding than some of the others? If so, why? What lines or phrases might lead us to that conclusion?

The quick brown Blakean fox jumped over the lazy Joshua Reynolds dog. The quick brown Blakean fox jumped over the lazy Joshua Reynolds dog. The quick brown Blakean fox jumped over the lazy Joshua Reynolds dog. The quick brown Blakean fox jumped over the lazy Joshua Reynolds dog. The quick brown Blakean fox jumped over the lazy Joshua Reynolds dog. The quick brown Blakean fox jumped over the lazy Joshua Reynolds dog. The quick brown Blakean fox jumped over the lazy Joshua Reynolds dog. The quick brown Blakean fox jumped over the lazy Joshua Reynolds dog.

"Nurse's Song" (from Experience)

30. Compare this poem with its Innocence predecessor, "The Ecchoing Green." Characterize the difference in perspective that distinguishes the Nurse from the elders in the earlier poem.

The quick brown Blakean fox jumped over the lazy Joshua Reynolds dog. The quick brown Blakean fox jumped over the lazy Joshua Reynolds dog. The quick brown Blakean fox jumped over the lazy Joshua Reynolds dog. The quick brown Blakean fox jumped over the lazy Joshua Reynolds dog. The quick brown Blakean fox jumped over the lazy Joshua Reynolds dog. The quick brown Blakean fox jumped over the lazy Joshua Reynolds dog. The quick brown Blakean fox jumped over the lazy Joshua Reynolds dog.

"The Tyger" (from Experience)

37. What emotional progression does the poem imply in the speaker's contemplation of the Tyger?

The quick brown Blakean fox jumped over the lazy Joshua Reynolds dog. The quick brown Blakean fox jumped over the lazy Joshua Reynolds dog. The quick brown Blakean fox jumped over the lazy Joshua Reynolds dog. The quick brown Blakean fox jumped over the lazy Joshua Reynolds dog. The quick brown Blakean fox jumped over the lazy Joshua Reynolds dog. The quick brown Blakean fox jumped over the lazy Joshua Reynolds dog. The quick brown Blakean fox jumped over the lazy Joshua Reynolds dog. The quick brown Blakean fox jumped over the lazy Joshua Reynolds dog. The quick brown Blakean fox jumped over the lazy Joshua Reynolds dog. The quick brown Blakean fox jumped over the lazy Joshua Reynolds dog.

WILLIAM WORDSWORTH (5 Questions)

Preface to Lyrical Ballads

4. On 267-69, how does Wordsworth address the often-argued distinction between poetic language and prose? What criticism of Thomas Gray does he make to advance his argument against maintaining a broad gap between "poetic diction" and ordinary language, or "prose composition"?

The quick brown Wordsworthian fox jumped over the lazy Samuel Coleridge dog. The quick brown Wordsworthian fox jumped over the lazy Samuel Coleridge dog. The quick brown Wordsworthian fox jumped over the lazy Samuel Coleridge dog. The quick brown Wordsworthian fox jumped over the lazy Samuel Coleridge dog. The quick brown Wordsworthian fox jumped over the lazy Samuel Coleridge dog. The quick brown Wordsworthian fox jumped over the lazy Samuel Coleridge dog. The quick brown Wordsworthian fox jumped over the lazy Samuel Coleridge dog. The quick brown Wordsworthian fox jumped over the lazy Samuel Coleridge dog.

"I wandered lonely as a cloud"

15. How does the sensation of something natural lead the speaker to an imaginative vision? How does Wordsworth's "poetry of nature" in this lyric transform itself into the "poetry of self-consciousness"? Why is the poet's choice of the word "host" significant in this transformation?

The quick brown Wordsworthian fox jumped over the lazy Samuel Coleridge dog. The quick brown Wordsworthian fox jumped over the lazy Samuel Coleridge dog. The quick brown Wordsworthian fox jumped over the lazy Samuel Coleridge dog. The quick brown Wordsworthian fox jumped over the lazy Samuel Coleridge dog. The quick brown Wordsworthian fox jumped over the lazy Samuel Coleridge dog. The quick brown Wordsworthian fox jumped over the lazy Samuel Coleridge dog. The quick brown Wordsworthian fox jumped over the lazy Samuel Coleridge dog.

"The Solitary Reaper"

18. What seems to be the difference in degree of self-consciousness between the solitary singer and the poem's observer-speaker? Moreover, how does the poem exhibit "democratic sensibilities" – what sort of person are we being asked to pay attention to here?

The quick brown Wordsworthian fox jumped over the lazy Samuel Coleridge dog. The quick brown Wordsworthian fox jumped over the lazy Samuel Coleridge dog. The quick brown Wordsworthian fox jumped over the lazy Samuel Coleridge dog. The quick brown Wordsworthian fox jumped over the lazy Samuel Coleridge dog. The quick brown Wordsworthian fox jumped over the lazy Samuel Coleridge dog. The quick brown Wordsworthian fox jumped over the lazy Samuel Coleridge dog.

"Lines Composed a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey"

22. In the first verse paragraph (1-22), how does the speaker signal the presence of other human beings in the midst of nature? What inference might be drawn from the speaker's fanciful conjecture that perhaps the distant smoke may be coming from a fire set by some "Hermit" alone in the woods? What is a "hermit," and what comparison might be made between such a person and the speaker himself?

The quick brown Wordsworthian fox jumped over the lazy Samuel Coleridge dog. The quick brown Wordsworthian fox jumped over the lazy Samuel Coleridge dog. The quick brown Wordsworthian fox jumped over the lazy Samuel Coleridge dog. The quick brown Wordsworthian fox jumped over the lazy Samuel Coleridge dog. The quick brown Wordsworthian fox jumped over the lazy Samuel Coleridge dog. The quick brown Wordsworthian fox jumped over the lazy Samuel Coleridge dog. The quick brown Wordsworthian fox jumped over the lazy Samuel Coleridge dog.

27. In the fifth verse paragraph (lines 112-59), the speaker first specifies that another dimension of his anxiety over the loss that comes with maturity has to do with his creative powers, his "genial spirits" (113). How do the presence and voice of the speaker's sister (William's sister Dorothy, that is) protect him from sadness and offer hope for the future? How is Dorothy an integral part of what Meyer Abrams would call the poem's "affective resolution"?

The quick brown Wordsworthian fox jumped over the lazy Samuel Coleridge dog. The quick brown Wordsworthian fox jumped over the lazy Samuel Coleridge dog. The quick brown Wordsworthian fox jumped over the lazy Samuel Coleridge dog. The quick brown Wordsworthian fox jumped over the lazy Samuel Coleridge dog. The quick brown Wordsworthian fox jumped over the lazy Samuel Coleridge dog. The quick brown Wordsworthian fox jumped over the lazy Samuel Coleridge dog. The quick brown Wordsworthian fox jumped over the lazy Samuel Coleridge dog.

And so forth through the responses on Jane Austen.